When Your Presence Is Necessary Instead of Using a Message

Written by on 12/19/2016 3:00 AM in , . It has 0 Comments.


Technology makes text and email messaging a quick and convenient method of communication. However, it can have a harmful effect on workplace morale when used in the wrong situation.

Nothing beats a good old-fashioned conversation in these specific work scenarios:

• When change is imminent.
Change is often scary, and may be difficult for your employees to process and embrace. In the work environment especially, where employees often envision the worst possible scenario of how a change might affect them. Referred to as “awfulizing,” if misinterpreted or left in question, your change could result in employees fearing for their jobs, lowering morale and increasing the likelihood of them seeking work elsewhere. To head off issues at-the-pass, meeting one-on-one and indulging in Q&A is highly advisable.

• When constructive criticism is warranted.
In the case of offering constructive criticism, typed correspondence is easily misinterpreted, from CAPS LOCK conundrums to overlooked intent. Delivering input in-person also provides the added bonus of allowing you to witness your employees' reaction, which can help you better tailor the message to help them be more receptive to feedback. Reinforcing the message in text or print, however, such as in response to a situation where your suggestions have been overlooked, is fine.

• When terminating an employee.
As a general rule, terminating an employee is best done in person, especially if the termination is unexpected. It’s empathetic, and offers the terminated employee the chance to hash out the logistical details of the process.

When stakes and emotions run high, protect your workplace morale with the right communication techniques. Gather the tools and information you need for success with the help of Minnesota Comp Advisor today.

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