Invest in Workplace Relationships to Improve Your Mental Health

Written by on 1/18/2017 3:46 AM in , , , , . It has 0 Comments.


It’s a well-known fact that social relationships are an essential component of good health. However, now a large study has confirmed not just positive relationships with family and friends - but increased connectivity with coworkers - boosts health and happiness both on and off the jobsite.

Workplace morale boosts more than mood
A meta-analysis posted in the journal Personality and Social Psychology Review, analyzing 58 past studies and encompassing 15 countries and 19,000 people across a variety of fields, uncovered those enjoying increased camaraderie with colleagues experienced:

• Improved physical and mental health.

• Far less “burnout.”

• An increased sense of belonging and community, commonly dubbed “we-ness.”

The wonder of “we-ness”
In social identity theory, “we-ness” begins, according to the author, with the concept that people don’t think just as individuals (in terms of “I”), but also as group members (in terms of the social identity “we”). This theory also suggests that viewing oneself as part of a group offers greater opportunity to view the world from the perspective of fellow group members, to be more open to influence by them, and more able to work in harmony with them.

Being part of this “we-ness” is linked to health and well-being in a host of ways, from an increased sense of belonging, meaning, and purpose, to an enhanced feeling of ownership or control over one’s actions. In the work environment, this leads to enhanced competence and productivity as this “we-ness” motivates employees to strive for positive identification within the group.

Workplace morale boosts are about more than a few easily-exchanged smiles. Dig a little deeper and reap the rewards with the help of Minnesota Comp Advisor today.

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